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 Gislaine Deram is originally from the Central African Republic but her family fled from Bemal when war and genocide came to their village. Fearing their safety, Gislaine's father sent the family to a refugee camp in Boko while he stayed behind to protect what was left of the extended family. However, he was eventually killed by a warring tribe. Gislaine and her family lived as refugees for over 7 years at a camp in Dosseye, Chad while awaiting resettlement to the U.S., which was finally granted them in 2011. They have lived in Clarkston ever since.

Gislaine Deram is originally from the Central African Republic but her family fled from Bemal when war and genocide came to their village. Fearing their safety, Gislaine's father sent the family to a refugee camp in Boko while he stayed behind to protect what was left of the extended family. However, he was eventually killed by a warring tribe. Gislaine and her family lived as refugees for over 7 years at a camp in Dosseye, Chad while awaiting resettlement to the U.S., which was finally granted them in 2011. They have lived in Clarkston ever since.

 Hani and Nahla Keddo are refugees from Syria that were resettled in Clarkston one year ago with help from World Relief, a non-profit that works with local churches to aid and care for refugees affected by disaster and violence across the world.

Hani and Nahla Keddo are refugees from Syria that were resettled in Clarkston one year ago with help from World Relief, a non-profit that works with local churches to aid and care for refugees affected by disaster and violence across the world.

 Naing Oo, a Burmese Refugee who works with the International Rescue Committee in Atlanta, Georgia.

Naing Oo, a Burmese Refugee who works with the International Rescue Committee in Atlanta, Georgia.

 A refugee in Clarkston poses for a portrait at the local soccer field. 

A refugee in Clarkston poses for a portrait at the local soccer field. 

 A refugee stands in the middle of the 40 Oaks Nature Preserve in Clarkston. He and his family use the land as part of a community garden to plant crops year round.

A refugee stands in the middle of the 40 Oaks Nature Preserve in Clarkston. He and his family use the land as part of a community garden to plant crops year round.

 Nathalie Wibabara, a refugee from Democratic Republic of the Congo who now works as a refugee-employment specialist for the Friends of Refugees.

Nathalie Wibabara, a refugee from Democratic Republic of the Congo who now works as a refugee-employment specialist for the Friends of Refugees.

 Eeco Paw’s family fled violence in Burma and landed at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand where Eeco was born. During this time his mother gave birth to two more children and was eventually approved for the refugee status that she applied for. Eeco’s family was selected to move to the U.S. in 2006 where they have lived in Clarkson ever since.

Eeco Paw’s family fled violence in Burma and landed at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand where Eeco was born. During this time his mother gave birth to two more children and was eventually approved for the refugee status that she applied for. Eeco’s family was selected to move to the U.S. in 2006 where they have lived in Clarkson ever since.

 A young girl holds the branch of a Crepe Mrytle tree. Her family fled violence in Burma and they have been living as refugees in Clarkston for over three years.

A young girl holds the branch of a Crepe Mrytle tree. Her family fled violence in Burma and they have been living as refugees in Clarkston for over three years.

 Asiah Merritt, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

Asiah Merritt, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

 A Rohingya refugee takes part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

A Rohingya refugee takes part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

 Friends of Refugee Founder, Pat Maddox, at the Forty Oaks Nature Preserve just next to her property in Clarkston.

Friends of Refugee Founder, Pat Maddox, at the Forty Oaks Nature Preserve just next to her property in Clarkston.

 Alexes Garrett, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

Alexes Garrett, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

 Rohingya refugees take part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

Rohingya refugees take part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

 Clarkston International Bible Church, headquarters of the non-profit Friends of Refugees.

Clarkston International Bible Church, headquarters of the non-profit Friends of Refugees.

 The Way Htoo, Law Wah, April Paw, and Mu Shi families are all refugees that have fled violence from their home in Burma and are now living in Clarkston.

The Way Htoo, Law Wah, April Paw, and Mu Shi families are all refugees that have fled violence from their home in Burma and are now living in Clarkston.

static1.squarespace.jpg
 Gislaine Deram is originally from the Central African Republic but her family fled from Bemal when war and genocide came to their village. Fearing their safety, Gislaine's father sent the family to a refugee camp in Boko while he stayed behind to protect what was left of the extended family. However, he was eventually killed by a warring tribe. Gislaine and her family lived as refugees for over 7 years at a camp in Dosseye, Chad while awaiting resettlement to the U.S., which was finally granted them in 2011. They have lived in Clarkston ever since.
 Hani and Nahla Keddo are refugees from Syria that were resettled in Clarkston one year ago with help from World Relief, a non-profit that works with local churches to aid and care for refugees affected by disaster and violence across the world.
 Naing Oo, a Burmese Refugee who works with the International Rescue Committee in Atlanta, Georgia.
 A refugee in Clarkston poses for a portrait at the local soccer field. 
 A refugee stands in the middle of the 40 Oaks Nature Preserve in Clarkston. He and his family use the land as part of a community garden to plant crops year round.
 Nathalie Wibabara, a refugee from Democratic Republic of the Congo who now works as a refugee-employment specialist for the Friends of Refugees.
 Eeco Paw’s family fled violence in Burma and landed at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand where Eeco was born. During this time his mother gave birth to two more children and was eventually approved for the refugee status that she applied for. Eeco’s family was selected to move to the U.S. in 2006 where they have lived in Clarkson ever since.
 A young girl holds the branch of a Crepe Mrytle tree. Her family fled violence in Burma and they have been living as refugees in Clarkston for over three years.
 Asiah Merritt, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.
 A Rohingya refugee takes part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.
 Friends of Refugee Founder, Pat Maddox, at the Forty Oaks Nature Preserve just next to her property in Clarkston.
 Alexes Garrett, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.
 Rohingya refugees take part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.
 Clarkston International Bible Church, headquarters of the non-profit Friends of Refugees.
 The Way Htoo, Law Wah, April Paw, and Mu Shi families are all refugees that have fled violence from their home in Burma and are now living in Clarkston.

Gislaine Deram is originally from the Central African Republic but her family fled from Bemal when war and genocide came to their village. Fearing their safety, Gislaine's father sent the family to a refugee camp in Boko while he stayed behind to protect what was left of the extended family. However, he was eventually killed by a warring tribe. Gislaine and her family lived as refugees for over 7 years at a camp in Dosseye, Chad while awaiting resettlement to the U.S., which was finally granted them in 2011. They have lived in Clarkston ever since.

Hani and Nahla Keddo are refugees from Syria that were resettled in Clarkston one year ago with help from World Relief, a non-profit that works with local churches to aid and care for refugees affected by disaster and violence across the world.

Naing Oo, a Burmese Refugee who works with the International Rescue Committee in Atlanta, Georgia.

A refugee in Clarkston poses for a portrait at the local soccer field. 

A refugee stands in the middle of the 40 Oaks Nature Preserve in Clarkston. He and his family use the land as part of a community garden to plant crops year round.

Nathalie Wibabara, a refugee from Democratic Republic of the Congo who now works as a refugee-employment specialist for the Friends of Refugees.

Eeco Paw’s family fled violence in Burma and landed at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand where Eeco was born. During this time his mother gave birth to two more children and was eventually approved for the refugee status that she applied for. Eeco’s family was selected to move to the U.S. in 2006 where they have lived in Clarkson ever since.

A young girl holds the branch of a Crepe Mrytle tree. Her family fled violence in Burma and they have been living as refugees in Clarkston for over three years.

Asiah Merritt, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

A Rohingya refugee takes part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

Friends of Refugee Founder, Pat Maddox, at the Forty Oaks Nature Preserve just next to her property in Clarkston.

Alexes Garrett, an Uhuru African Dancer, poses for a portrait during rehearsal at the Clarkston Community Center. The Uhuru Dancers are the oldest African dance company in the Atlanta area.

Rohingya refugees take part in a rally protesting the genocide of the Rohingya people in Burma. The rally, led by Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry, was held at Memorial Drive Presbyterian Church on September 1, 2017.

Clarkston International Bible Church, headquarters of the non-profit Friends of Refugees.

The Way Htoo, Law Wah, April Paw, and Mu Shi families are all refugees that have fled violence from their home in Burma and are now living in Clarkston.

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